Launching our new Code of Journalistic Ethics

I’ve heard a lot of positive feedback from our members and it appears that the 2016 national conference was a great success. Thank you again to our special partners, sponsors and attendees for your support and commitment to RTDNA Canada. Congratulations also to all the award winners, your work was recognised for its outstanding quality.

I’ve heard a lot of positive feedback from our members and it appears that the 2016 national conference was a great success. Thank you again to our special partners, sponsors and attendees for your support and commitment to RTDNA Canada. Congratulations also to all the award winners, your work was recognised for its outstanding quality.
The Board met at the end of conference and prioritised the association’s major areas of work moving forward. We are assembling a number of committees to continue the process of contemporising the organisation and allowing for new growth opportunities. Each of these committees will be inviting input and feedback from the membership. Right now, they’re etching terms of reference and timelines. Watch for more information here soon. We will be focusing on sponsorship and new revenue streams, membership, awards and by-laws.

The Conference committee has already begun the process of planning for 2017 in terms of an overall theme, content and structure. We hope to present a working conference framework within a few months.

On Canada Day, RTDNA Canada’s new Code of Journalistic Ethics will officially be in effect.

RTDNA_Canada_Code_1July2016_posterAn informed public is vital to a democratic society. Canadian journalism’s purpose is to serve the public interest. It is our responsibility to act independently, to be fair and respectful, and to report the facts. The five areas of the Code are: Accuracy, Fairness, Independence, Integrity and Respect. (download a poster of the 2016 Code)

The CBSC will administer the revised code vis-à-vis its broadcaster associates. The CBSC’s administration of the RTDNA code continues a relationship between the two organizations that was first established in September 1993 and later recognized by the CRTC in February 1994.

The updates reflect the changing landscape of our industry. Anyone using these guidelines — broadcast or online — will meet the standards of professional journalists in Canada. We encourage its adoption by all practicing journalists.
On behalf of the RTDNA Board, happy Canada Day!

Ian Koenigsfest
president@rtdnacanada.com
@iankoenigsfest

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  • Robert Laboucane
    July 6, 2016, 12:32 pm

    I cannot emphasize enough the critical need for journalists to learn the correct terminology when speaking about or writing about Canada’s Indigenous peoples. The references and language used by the vast majority of journalists when reporting on various Indigenous groups, issues and activities is quite simply ignorant and disparaging to this community of citizens. It really is amazing how wrong and confusing so many journalists are when it comes to reporting to their readership. We have the blind leading the blind and this really should addressed. (www.aboriginalawarenesscanada.com)

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